7 Reasons An Exercise Is Bad For You

Exercises described in books, shown in dvds and fitness magazines, or taught in group classes, may not be appropriate for everyone.

The solution to exercises that aren’t good for you, is to learn the modified version.

If equipment is used in the exercise, it might be too small, too big, too heavy, or doesn’t fit your body.   To solve the problem, adjust the equipment, so that the exercise can be performed correctly.

An exercise that is performed correctly is safer, and will give better results.

How To Tell If An Exercise Is Bad For You

  1. You experience discomfort, or pain while performing the exercise. 
  2. The exercise is too difficult to do correctly. 
  3. During the exercise, you’re using body parts that should be stationary. 
  4. The exercise is so difficult, that it causes labored breathing, or breath-holding.
  5. Instead of the results you want, you get injured.
  6. The equipment isn’t adjustable to suit your  strength,  flexibility, endurance, or body dimensions.
  7. The exercise is known to be risky.

 

Irene Pastore is a native New Yorker, health and fitness blogger, and personal trainer. Irene owns this website, and writes all the blog posts. For her complete bio, visit the About Page.

Copyright 2016 Irene Pastore and Tour De Core.com

 

7 Prenatal Exercise Tips

Pregnancy isn’t a time to challenge yourself, or to take on risky exercise routines.  Follow these tips, and play it safe while exercising during your pregnancy.

  1. Choose moderate exercise activities, such as walking, water aerobics, swimming, prenatal yoga, or stationary bike.
  2. Stop exercising when you start feeling tired.
  3. Never exercise to exhaustion.
  4. Don’t allow your body to get overheated.
  5. Drink plenty of water.
  6. Clothing should be comfortable. Wear a supportive bra.   Wear sturdy athletic shoes for good balance, and to protect your feet.
  7. Heed the warnings of when to stop exercising: dizziness, shortness of breath, back pain, swelling or numbness, nausea,  or an uneven, racing heart beat.

Irene Pastore is a native New Yorker, health and fitness blogger, and personal trainer. Irene owns this website, and writes all the blog posts. For her complete bio, visit the About Page.

Copyright 2016 Irene Pastore and Tour De Core.com

 

7 Benefits of Prenatal Exercise

A well-rounded prenatal exercise program includes
aerobics, stretching, strengthening, and relaxation. Here is a quick list of 7  prenatal exercise benefits

  1. Helps you and your baby gain the proper amounts of weight.
  2. Reduces the discomforts of pregnancy, such as back aches, leg cramps, constipation, bloating, and swelling.
  3. Lowers the risk of gestational diabetes (diabetes found for the first time when a woman is pregnant).
  4. Boosts mood and energy level.
  5. Improves sleep.
  6. Helps with an easier, shorter labor.
  7. Assists with faster recovery from delivery, and return to a healthy weight.

Irene Pastore is a native New Yorker, health and fitness blogger, and personal trainer. Irene owns this website, and writes all the blog posts. For her complete bio, visit the About Page.

Copyright 2016 Irene Pastore and Tour De Core.com

Healthy Prenatal Quick Tips

Weight Gain

  • Discuss with your doctor about how much weight you should gain during your pregnancy.

Nutrition

  • Eat foods rich in folate, iron, calcium, and protein. Consult with your physician about prenatal nutritional supplements.
  • Consume a healthy breakfast every day.
  • Consume foods high in fiber, and drink plenty of water to avoid constipation.
  • Eliminate empty calorie foods, and focus on nutritious eating.
  • Avoid alcohol, raw or undercooked fish, fish high in mercury, undercooked meat and poultry, and soft cheeses.

Physical Activity

  • Be physically active on most, or all, days of the week. If you have health concerns, talk to your physician before you begin.

Postnatal

  • After pregnancy, slowly get back to your routine of regular, moderate-intensity physical activity.
  • Return to a healthy weight slowly.

Information from the National Institutes of Health

Irene Pastore is a native New Yorker, health and fitness blogger, and personal trainer. Irene owns this website, and writes all the blog posts. For her complete bio, visit the About Page.

Copyright 2016 Irene Pastore and Tour De Core.com

 

Quick Guide To Whole Grains and Seeds

GRAINS

Barley Soup
Barley Soup

Barley: Barley is a hearty grain that compliments winter meals. Add to soups, and stews, or combine with sautéed onions and celery. Contains gluten.

Corn: Use cornmeal flour to bake delicious muffins, and breads. Corn flour is also used in making pasta.  Contains a type of gluten different from that found in wheat.

Kamut: A firm-textured ancient wheat with a nutty, sweet and buttery flavor. Contains gluten.

Farro: An ancient Italian grain that may have sustained the Roman Legions.

Oatmeal-Raisin Cookies

Farro is used in soups, salads, and desserts.  Looks and tastes somewhat like brown rice, with a nutty taste.  Farro is also known as Emmer.  Contains gluten.

Millet: A tiny grain, that looks like a seed.  Use it like rice as a side dish, or in a casserole. Gluten-free.

Oats: A sweet-flavored grain commonly used in preparing warm cereal, and cookies.  Oats contain avenin, a protein that may trigger a reaction in celiacs.

Rice: Varieties include Brown, White, Short and Long Grain. Sticky White Rice is used in preparing sushi rolls.  White and Brown Basmati is another variety with a rich nutty flavor. Gluten-free.

Whole Wheat Linguine
Whole Wheat Linguine

Rye: Rye is a member of the wheat family, and is used in bread making, and Scandinavian crispbreads, and crackers.  Contains gluten.

Spelt: An ancient variety of wheat. Spelt produces baked goods lighter in texture and easier to digest than standard wheat. Contains gluten.

Triticale: This grain is a hybrid of rye and wheat. Triticale flour is used to bake muffins, breads, cakes, and crispbreads. Contains gluten.

Wheat: The most widely known grain used in baking breads, cookies, cakes, noodles, pasta, and pies. Contains gluten.

SEEDS 

The seeds on this list are used the same way as grains.  Common uses are breakfast cereals, side dishes, and casseroles.  Seeds are available as flour for baking.  If you’re wheat intolerant,  try using seeds.  They’re lighter than wheat, and have their own unique taste.

Amaranth: A very tiny seed used in making breakfast cereal, added to soups and stews.  Gluten-free.

Buckwheat: Buy Toasted Buckwheat, or Raw.  Use in soups, or as a side dish.    Whole Buckwheat flour makes great pancakes.  If you don’t mind the dark brown color, buckwheat can be used to make cookies, and sweet breads. Gluten-free.

Quinoa: A small seed, that comes in white, black or red. Add fruit and nuts to Quinoa to make a tasty breakfast porridge  Trader Joe’s sells their own brand of penne and fusilli pasta made from Quinoa and Rice.   Gluten-free.

Teff: Teff is an ancient seed, cultivated for thousands of years in Abyssinia.  Teff seeds are about the same size as a poppy-seed.  Teff comes in white, red and dark brown.  Teff flour is used to bake breads, and pie crust.   The seeds can be steamed, boiled, and baked.  Gluten-free.

GRAIN & SEED GALLERY

Irene Pastore is a native New Yorker, health and fitness blogger, and personal trainer. Irene owns this website, and writes all the blog posts. For her complete bio, visit the About Page.

Copyright 2016 Irene Pastore and Tour De Core.com